Concussion: Protect, Recognize and Treat – Summer 2015

A concussion is also known as a mild traumatic brain injury and is caused by a blow or jolt to the head that temporarily interrupts brain function. Most concussions occur without a loss of consciousness or blacking out. Click the link to learn how to protect, recognize and treat your child’s concussion.

Concussion Facts

 

The Fort Riley Hearing Program is HEAR for You

The Fort Riley Hearing Program is aimed at hearing education and hearing loss prevention.

We are here to help anyone in the Fort Riley community and are available for Service members, their families, and DoD employees.

Services Offered:

  • Hearing Protection Devices
  • Audiological Services
  • Education and Consultations
  • Unit Hearing Program Officer (HPO) Training
  • Range Inspections
  • Annual Unit Hearing Briefings
  • Hearing Technician Certification (Military and DoD civilians)
  • Community Health Presentations
  • Noise Surveys
  • Soldier Readiness Processing (SRP)

Hearing Loss Facts:

  • Approximately 36 million Americans have hearing loss. One in three developed their hearing loss due to an exposure to noise (American Academy of Audiology, 2011).
  • Noise-induced hearing loss is an invisible injury and 100 percent preventable.
  • All military personnel as well as noise-exposed civilian employees are enrolled in the Hearing Conservation program.
  • Hearing protectors are not one size fits all.

Feel free to contact us anytime.

Phone: (785) 239-7042 or 239-7323.

 

 

 

 

 

New Clinic Cuts Wait Times

IACH Public Affairs

Army families now have an easier way to get urgent care on Fort Riley. A new Extended Care Clinic at Irwin Army Community Hospital will offer walk-in medical care for acute, non-emergent complaints starting July 31.

The ECC is designed to avoid potentially long wait times at the Emergency Room for non-emergent patients. The Urgent Care Clinic will permanently close.

Located at Medical Home 2 near the front entrance of the hospital, the ECC will open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and closes on federal holidays.

The new clinic will improve access for patients who are not necessarily an emergency but need to be seen that same day, said Department of Primary Care Chief Maj. Summer Bryant.Extended Care Clinic Hours

“The goal behind this is to have all of our beneficiaries seen in Primary Care, and that can be done faster than sharing space with the ER (Emergency Room),” Bryant said.

Under the old system, the UCC was located in the ER and patients experienced longer wait times due to its location.

“Before if you came in with an earache you have to go to urgent care, but were triaged through the ER system which slowed things down and overcrowded the ER,” she said.

Patients are now able to triage themselves and decide which option best fits their needs, Bryant said.

“If you are experiencing chest pains, the worst headache of your life or you’re in a car crash, then you go to the ER. The Extended Care Clinic is for patients who have a cough, cold, earache, a potential broken bone, or anything that is not necessarily an emergency but need to be seen today.”

The ECC will be staffed with up to two providers daily depending on demand. Please note that the ECC does not replace the ER. Patients with an emergency such as chest pain, difficulty breathing, severe bleeding, loss of consciousness or vision should go to the ER immediately or call 911.

 

Protect Your Child’s Mouth During Physical Activity

With 25 million children involved in organized sports, there is an increased risk for oral and facial injuries. Athletes are 60 times more likely to suffer injury to their teeth and jaws when they fail to protect them. Help protect your child’s smile by making sure they use mouth guards.

Mouth Guard Tips

mouthguards

Better Nutrition = A Better Student

More fruits and vegetables improve health and school performance. Children and teens should fill half of their plate with fruits and vegetables at each meal. Fruits and vegetables provide essential vitamins and minerals, lower risk for chronic diseases and help kids maintain a healthy weight. Click the link to below for more information on how good nutrition leads to a better student.

Better Nutrition = Better StudentP3 Tri Logo icons_only

 

 

Extended Care Clinic to Replace Urgent Care Clinic

As of July 31 patients with an acute, non-emergent complaint can avoid potentially long waits at the Emergency Room with IACH’s new Extended Care Clinic. The Urgent Care Clinic will close permanently.

Located at Medical Home 2 near the front entrance of the hospital, the ECC will open Monday – Friday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

The ECC will see patients on a walk-in basis if they are unable to get a same-day appointment with their PCM. Reasons to go to the Extended Care Clinic include:

-Cough and sore throat
-Fever or flu-like symptoms
-Sprains and strains
-Broken bones
-Rashes or skin irritations

Please note that the Extended Care Clinic does not replace the Emergency Room. Patients with an emergency such as chest pain, difficulty breathing, severe bleeding, loss of consciousness or vision should go the Emergency Room immediately or call
911.

Update on TRICARE Coverage of Breast Pumps

New Where are the local Fort Riley breast pump providers?

GCH Home Medical Via Christi Home Medical
1310 West Ash St suite B 2439 Claflin Road
Junction City KS 66441 Manhattan KS 66502
(785) 762-2983 (785) 537-3699
HyVee Pharmacy Kollhoff Pharmacy
601 3rd Place 407 South Washington Street
Manhattan KS 66502 Junction City KS 66441
(785) 587-8648 (785) 238-1000

New Is there a handout for providers?

Yes. See link… Tricare Breast Pump Coverage for Providers.

Who can get a manual or standard electric breast pump, supplies, and breastfeeding counseling services?

All TRICARE-eligible female beneficiaries with a “birth event.” A birth event includes a pregnant beneficiary or a female beneficiary who legally adopts an infant and intends to personally breastfeed.

It doesn’t matter what TRICARE plan you use (TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Standard, USFHP, TRICARE Reserve Select, etc.) or your sponsor’s status (active duty, retired, Guard/Reserve).

How do I get a breast pump?

  1. Get a prescription.
    • Your prescription must be from any TRICARE-authorized doctor, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or nurse midwife.
    • Your prescription must show if you’re getting a manual or standard electric To get a hospital-grade pump, you need to work with your provider and regional contractor to get a referral and authorization.
    • Your breast pump and supplies can be on the same prescription.
    • Your prescription doesn’t have to specify a brand.
    • We suggest you make a copy of your prescription for your
  2. Get a pump.
    • If you don’t want to pay up front, contact UnitedHealthcare Military West (877) 988-9378 to find a network provider. You give the provider your prescription.
    • If you want to get your pump from a military clinic or hospital, follow their processes and procedures.
    • If you don’t mind paying up front, go to a TRICARE-authorized provider, supplier, or vendor and make sure to save and copy your receipt. You won’t need to show your prescription.
  3. File a claim.
    • If you use a network provider, the provider files your claim.
    • If you bought the pump yourself, you have to fill out a DD Form 2642, attach a copy of the prescription and itemized receipt, and mail it to TRICARE West Region Claims Department, P.O. BOX 7064, Camden, SC 29021-7064.
    • It may take up to 60 days to process your claim.
  4. Check your Explanation of Benefits (mail or online).

I bought a breast pump. How do I get reimbursed?

  1. Find your receipt.
    • Your receipt has to show you bought the pump on or after Dec. 19, 2014.
    • You must have been TRICARE eligible on the date you bought it.
    • If you can’t find your receipt, you bought the pump before December 19, 2014, or you weren’t eligible when you bought it, you cannot get reimbursed.
  2. Get a prescription.
    • You must get your prescription from any TRICARE-authorized doctor, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or nurse midwife, even if you already bought a pump.
    • The date on the prescription can be after the date on your receipt.
    • Your prescription must show the type of pump you bought (manual or standard electric pump).
    • Your breast pump and supplies can be on the same prescription.
    • Your prescription doesn’t have to specify a brand.
    • We suggest you make a copy of your prescription for your records.
  3. File a claim.
    • You have to fill out a DD Form 2642, attach a copy of your prescription and receipt, and mail it to TRICARE West Region Claims Department, P.O. BOX 7064, Camden, SC 29021-7064.
    • It may take up to 60 days to process your claim.
  4. Check your Explanation of Benefits (mail or online).

I’m no longer TRICARE eligible, but bought a breast pump when I was eligible. Can I still file a claim?

Yes, as long as your receipt shows you bought the pump on or after December 19, 2014.

What breast pump supplies are covered?

Your supplies must match the type of pump on your prescription. TRICARE covers:

  • Standard power adapters
  • Tubing and tubing adaptors
  • Locking rings
  • Bottles
  • Bottle caps
  • Shield/splash protectors
  • Storage bags
  • Up to 2 breast pump kits per birth event

TRICARE does not cover:

  • Breast pump batteries, battery-powered adapters, and battery packs
  • Regular “baby bottles” (bottles not specific to pump operation), including associated nipples, caps, and lids
  • Travel bags and other similar carrying accessories
  • Breast pump cleaning supplies
  • Baby weight scales
  • Garments and other products that allow hands-free pump operation
  • Ice packs, labels, labeling lids, and other similar products
  • Nursing bras, bra pads, breast shells, and other similar products
  • Over-the-counter creams, ointments, and other products that relieve breastfeeding related symptoms or conditions of the breasts or nipples

Where can I get breast pump supplies?

You can get breast pump supplies from any:

  • Firm, supplier, or provider that accepts TRICARE
  • Commissary
  • Post Exchange (PX)
  • Civilian stateside and overseas retail stores (such as Walmart, Target, Babies”R”Us)
  • Civilian stateside and overseas retail drug stores (not available through TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery)
  • Online store (such as Amazon.com; shipping and handling not included)

When can I get breast pump supplies?

As a mother-to-be, you can get breast pump supplies before or up to 3 years (36 months) after the “birth event.” A birth event includes a pregnant beneficiary or a female beneficiary who legally adopts an infant and intends to personally breastfeed.

 How do I get TRICARE to cover breast pump supplies?

  1. Get supplies.
    • If you don’t want to pay up front, contact UnitedHealthcare Military West (877) 988-9378 to find a network provider.
    • If you want to get your supplies from a military clinic or hospital, follow their processes and procedures.
    • If you don’t mind paying up front, go to a TRICARE-authorized provider, supplier, or vendor and make sure to save and copy your receipt.
  2. File a claim.
    • If you use a network provider, the provider files your
    • If you bought the supplies yourself, fill out a DD Form 2642, attach a copy of the receipt, a copy of your breast pump prescription, and mail it to TRICARE West Region Claims Department, P.O. BOX 7064, Camden, SC 29021-7064.
    • It may take up to 60 days to process your
  3. Check your Explanation of Benefits (mail or online).

Does TRICARE cover breastfeeding (lactation) counseling?

Yes, you may get up to 6 individual outpatient breastfeeding/lactation counseling sessions, per birth event when:

  • Your provider bills using one of the preventive counseling procedure codes;
  • Breastfeeding/lactation counseling is the only service you get; and
  • You see a TRICARE-authorized provider

These sessions are in addition to the counseling you may have gotten during your inpatient stay, outpatient OB visit, or well-child care visit.

You don’t need a referral or authorization for breastfeeding/lactation counseling.

Can I get reimbursed for lactation counseling that I got on or after Dec. 19, 2014?

Yes, as long as:

  • Your provider bills using one of the preventive counseling procedure codes;
  • Breastfeeding/lactation counseling is the only service you get; and
  • The provider is TRICARE-authorized.

How do I get reimbursed for lactation counseling?

If you saw a:

  • Network provider, ask the provider to file a claim for you.
  • Non-network provider, fill out a DD Form 2642, attach an itemized statement, and mail it to TRICARE West Region Claims Department, P.O. BOX 7064, Camden, SC 29021-7064.
  • It may take up to 60 days to process your claim

Does TRICARE cover breastfeeding counseling from an Independent Board-Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) or Certified Lactation Counselor (CLC)?

No, unless they’re also a TRICARE-authorized doctor, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, nurse midwife, or registered nurse.

Can I get reimbursed for a rented hospital-grade breast pump I returned?

Yes, as long as you meet medical necessity. To file a claim, fill out a DD Form 2642, attach copies of your prescription, itemized billing statement, and documentation of medical necessity from your provider, and mail it to your  TRICARE West Region Claims Department, P.O. BOX 7064, Camden, SC 29021-7064. It may take up to 60 days to process your claim.